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Behold below some of the world’s most scenic spots. Trust us, you’re going to want to see ALL of these first hand. And, of course, you’re going to want to snap a couple pictures in front of them. But at the risk of sounding like your mom… Be careful for pete’s sake! From a suspended Nordic boulder to a doubledecker bridge in the Indian subcontintent, here’s a sampling of stunning places to add to your travel list stat. Plus, be sure to check out the latest deals on Orbitz for more inspiration.
 

You don’t want to take out your selfie stick for this one. Photo by Paul Edmundson

We’re all for taking that next big road trip, and buying that round-the-world ticket, and diving with whale sharks, but we confess: We’re allergic to the term “bucket list.” That said, when we flipped through The Bucket List: 1000 Adventures Big & Small, we were pleasantly surprised with the sheer variety of unique ideas and blown away by the incredible photos of stunning landscapes and events — many in spots we’ve heard little to nothing about. The book is split up along longitudes and latitudes, and there’s a helpful corresponding webpage linking to coordinates of all 1,000 tasks. A thousand is a lot — daunting, even. Start below with an excerpt of our favorites.

 

Rogaland, Norway

Wedged in a mountain crevice on the edge of Kjerag mountain, the Kjeragbolten boulder is suspended over a near-3,280 ft high drop. It’s accessible, after a hike, without any climbing equipment — simply jump up onto the large rock for a very memorable photo op.

Giant's Causeway

Giant’s Causeway. Photo by Tonnaja Anan Charoenkal.

 

Northern Ireland, UK

Take in all six counties that make up Northern Ireland on the mammoth 625-mile circular walk that is the magnificent Ulster Way. Opened in the 1970s, the project’s aim was to take long-distance hikers through some of the most beautiful scenery the Northern Irish countryside has to offer. The most popular place to start is the curious Giant’s Causeway, with its ancient stone “steps,” which jut out in the sea of the country’s northern coastline.

Oma Painted Forest

Oma Painted Forest. Photo by Melba Photo Agency.

 

Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve, Spain

A stroll through the peaceful Oma Painted Forest amid colorful Monterey pine trees is a feast for the senses. In the 1980s, sculptor and artist Augustín Ibarrola painted unique patterns on the tree trunks here, some of which change shape and perspective as you move through the forest. This open-air museum is a form of “land art” — where nature is used as the artist’s frame — and features artworks that are representative of nearby Paleolithic cave art.

Ukai Fishing

Ukai is best seen from May to October. Photo by The Asahi Shimbun.

 

Nagaragawa River, Gifu, Japan

Charlie Chaplin was said to have been a fan of Ukai (meaning: fishing with cormorants), a 1,300-year-old Japanese tradition similar to falconry. Performed at night, with sake flowing, the fishermen manipulate both the water and trained birds to trap and sweetfish in the shallows.

India Root Bridges

A double-decker bridge in Nongriat village. Photo by Amos Chappel.

 

Meghalaya, India

Created from rubber tree roots guided across rivers by the Khasi tribe of northern India, the living-root walkways can support up to fifty people. Marvel at the double-decker bridge in Nongriat village, in the Cherrapunji rainforest.

 

Mauritius

The end of the rainbow is in Mauritius. Photo by Konstik / iStock.

Chamarel, Mauritius

Feast your eyes upon the colored earth of Chamarel, a vision so bizarre, it feels almost like an optical illusion. Rolling dunes of rainbow-colored earth in the Rivièra Noire District of Mauritius have been formed by the weathering of volcanic rock and the minerals within it, creating a mind-bending pastel rainbow backdrop. 

 

This article was written by Kath Stathers from Fathom and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

 

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Tagged: Africa, Asia, Europe, Spain

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